Do the Next Thing

When you find yourself frozen with fear, plagued by insecurities, overwhelmed with life, or experiencing suffering, this poem is for you. The author is unknown, but it has been loved and used by many godly people through the years- Elisabeth Elliott being one of them. It’s one of her favorites and I often find myself quoting, “Do the next thing” in many different circumstances.

From an old English parsonage, down by the sea
There came in the twilight a message to me;
Its quaint Saxon legend, deeply engraven,
Hath, as it seems to me, teaching from Heaven.
And on through the hours the quiet words ring
Like a low inspiration–”DO THE NEXT THING.”

Many a question, many of fear,
Many a doubt, hath its quieting here.
Moment by moment, let down from Heaven,
Time, opportunity, guidance, are given.
Fear not tomorrows, Child of the King,
Trust them with Jesus, “DO THE NEXT THING.”

Do it immediately; do it with prayer;
Do it reliantly, casting all care;
Do it with reverence, tracing His Hand
Who placed it before thee with earnest command.
Stayed on Omnipotence, safe ‘neath His wing,
Leave all resultings, “DO THE NEXT THING.”

Looking to Jesus, ever serener,
(Working or suffering) be thy demeanor,
In His dear presence, the rest of His calm,
The light of His countenance be thy psalm,
Strong in His faithfulness, praise and sing,
Then, as He beckons thee, “DO THE NEXT THING.”

– Author Unknown

Favorite Fall Pins

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I’m going to be making this soon! I think mine will say “eucharisteo” (the Greek for “gratitude”). One of my favorite words.

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I feel this every year.

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Beautiful.

Currently.

This was so true last week.

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I love rainy fall days. We’ve had a lot of those this weekend.

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Yes to all of the above.

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I just made this last week. To.Die.For. Click the picture for the link to the recipe.

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Last but not lease. My favorite fall quote by one of my all time favorite fictional characters.

Susannah Spurgeon on Libraries and Love

1“The best room became the library. ‘We never encumbered ourselves’, said Mrs. Spurgeon, ‘with what a modern writer calls “the draw-back of a drawing room”, perhaps for the good reason that we were such homely, busy people that we had no need of so useless a place- but more especially, I think, because the best room was always felt to belong by right to the one who “labored much in the Lord”. Never have I regretted this early decision; it is a wise arrangement for a minister’s house, if not for any other.'” (pg 156)

“But I verily believe that when I join him, “beyond the smiling and the weeping”, there will be tender remembrances of all these details of earthly love and of the plenitudes of blessings which it garnered in our united lives. Surely we shall talk of all these things in the pauses of adoring worship and joyful service. There must be sweet converse in heaven between those who loved and suffered and served together here below. Next to the rapture of seeing the King in his beauty and beholding the face of him who redeemed us to God by his blood, must be the happiness of the communion of saints in that place of inconceivable blessedness which God has prepared for them that love him.'” (pg 180)

And with that, Mrs. Spurgeon, I heartily agree.

*excerpts taken from: Free Grace and Dying Love/The Life of Susannah Surgeon: Morning Devotions by Susannah Spurgeon